Ethnic Studies Courses

The program offers a wide range of courses that fulfill both Multicultural Perspectives and many other General Education requirements. Ethnic Studies courses also complement many majors and minors in the humanities, social sciences, the arts, and education, such as English, History, Religious Studies, Psychology, Sociology, Art, Communication Studies, and Education.

AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY ETHS 359 D ETHS (4.00 credits)
African American history from the beginning of the African Diaspora to the present. Cross-listed: HIST 359 D. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: None.
ASIAN AMERICAN EXPERIENCE ETHS 271 2DH ETHS (4.00 credits)
This course examines major issues in the history of the Asian American experience from the middle of the 19th century to present, including the causes of early Asian immigration, the formation of Asian American communities and Asian American culture/identity, the history of exclusion/discrimination and resistance, and Asian Americans' contributions to American democracy. While special attention will be given to Chinese and Japanese Americans, students will also examine other Asian immigrants, such as East Indians, Koreans, and Hmongs. As it is a community-based learning course, students in this class are required to participate in activities that will allow them to interact with Asian Americans in the greater Madison community to explore Asian American cultures and race/ethnic relations. They will be guided to rethink their sense of self, their relations with other race/ethnic groups, and their American identity through studying Asian American views on self, community, social justice, equal rights, and democracy. Out of this experience, a deep understanding of their role in constructing a more justice and compassionate world will be achieved. Cross-listed: HIST 251 2DH. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: Completion of COR 1 or COR 199 or COR 199 in progress; two full-time semesters of college credit, excluding retro credits, AP credits, and college credit earned while in high school.
ASIAN AMERICAN WRITERS ETHS 325A CDQ ETHS (4.00 credits)
This course offers a study of selected works of various genres (e.g., fiction, poetry, drama, and film) by Asian American women and men of diverse ethnicities. Emphasizing the intersections of race, gender, class, and sexuality, and informed by critical studies of race and ethnicity, feminist criticism, and cultural studies, we will explore the following main questions: What are the major themes and issues in Asian American literature and literary studies? What textual strategies do Asian American writers employ to represent Asian American self-identities and cultural politics? In what ways do these writers challenge or accommodate dominant representations of Asian American women and men as raced and gendered subjects? In what ways do the subject positions of the writers, characters, and readers impact our understanding of Asian American texts? Cross-listed: ENG 325A CDQ. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: ENG 110 W and Sophomore standing.
BLACK THEO & DSMNTLG OF RACISM, I ETHS 480H ETHS (2.00 credits)
The first of a two-semester seminar, this course is an opportunity to identify and develop your personal spirituality through the study of Black Liberation Theologies and dismantling racism. You will integrate insights from the philosophy of Martin Luther King, Jr., and the theologies of Black and Womanist theologians in reflecting on your own community-based engagement in the dismantling of racism and building "the beloved community" envisioned by Dr. King. This two-semester sequence meets one day each week for two hours in both the Fall and Spring semesters and requires significant participation in community-based and/or service-learning. Both semesters are required to fulfill COR 2 or ETHS 480H. Cross-listed: RS 308  Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: Completion of COR 1 or COR 199 or COR 199 in progress; two full-time semesters of college credit, excluding retro credits, AP credits, and college credit earned while in high school.
BLACK THEO & DSMNTLG OF RACISM, I ETHS 480H 2DR ETHS (2.00 credits)
The ETHS 480H/ETHS 480I sequence satisfies the 2, D, and R tags. To receive these tags, a student must enroll in and successfully complete both the fall and spring courses. If you wish to receive the 2, D, and R tags for this sequence (which is set up as two separate courses), enroll in ETHS 480H at this time and ETHS 480I 2DR in Spring. The tags will be added to your record after successful completion of ETHS 480I 2DR in the Spring term. Cross-listed: RS 308. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: Completion of COR 1 or COR 199 or COR 199 in progress; two full-time semesters of college credit, excluding retro credits, AP credits, and college credit earned while in high school.
BLACK THEO & DSMNTLG OF RACISM, II ETHS 480I 2DR ETHS (2.00 credits)
Integrating insights from the first semester's consideration of racism and white privilege, the philosophy of Martin Luther King, Jr., and the theologies of Black and Womanist Theologians, this semester focuses on what is being done to dismantle racism in your own field of study (major or minor), area of community involvement (volunteer or athletic organization) or intended career path. Students are required to participate in the annual White Privilege Conference (additional cost for travel and registration) OR a minimum of 20 hours of community-based anti-racism or healing racism series and multicultural trainings offered in the Madison area. Students report on their own efforts to dismantle racism during the annual Student Academic Showcase. Each student completes a COR 2 Statement connecting learning beliefs/values and stance on racism and building "the beloved community" envisioned by Dr. King. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: ETHS 480H.
BLACK WOMEN WRITERS ETHS 415A CDQ ETHS (4.00 credits)
This course offers a study of selected novels, short stories, and essays by African American women writers in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.  Emphasizing the intersections of race, gender, class, and sexuality, and informed by critical studies of race and ethnicity and Black feminist criticism, we will explore the following main questions: What are the major themes and issues in Black women's literature?  What textual strategies do African American women writers employ to represent Blackness, womanhood, and Black womanhood? In what ways do these writers challenge or accommodate dominant discourses of race, gender, class, and sexuality? What does it mean to be a Black feminist reader, and what does it mean for non-Black and/or non-female readers to interpret Black women's writings? Cross-listed: ENG 415A CDQ and WS 415A CDQ. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: Completion of W Tag.
BRDG BRDR: US/MEXICO IMMIGRATION ETHS 385 2DG ETHS (4.00 credits)
This course will examine the root causes of Mexican immigration to the U..S, as well as the cultural practices and public policies that have built physical and symbolic walls between the two countries. We will also learn about the educational and social activist work of "bridging" organizations that promote understanding and advocate for the human rights of immigrants. Cross-listed: SOC 385. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: Completion of COR 1 or COR 199 or COR 199 in progress; two full-time semesters of college credit, excluding retro credits, AP credits, and college credit earned while in high school. Course Fee: $1200 to cover travel, housing, and expenses.
CONTEMPORARY GLOBAL FEMINISMS ETHS 481 GQU ETHS (4.00 credits)
What issues are important to women in different parts of the world? How do those issues relate to one another? What makes an issue "feminist" or not? How do we conceive of feminisms outside of our borders, whether those borders are geographic, political, or personal? What strategies can we employ to understand women's lives and concerns in different cultures, locations, and times? Is it possible to actively support feminist causes across the globe without imposing dangerous sets of limiting assumptions? This course is an exploration of the methods, concepts, and experiences of feminism as it is practiced all over the world in different ways. The historical development and cultural mappings of feminism since the second wave will be our main concern, but we will maintain specificity by focusing on particular locations, and on locational concerns. Three large units will make up the course: feminism and race at the end of the second wave and into the present; postcolonial critiques of feminism and issues of religion, rights, and class in various locations throughout the world; and transnational approaches to feminist identity, politics and possibilities. Throughout our explorations of contemporary feminisms, we will interrogate how our own lives and choices affect the lives of women around the world, in part by investigating the origins of products we purchase regularly. Feminist theorists from a variety of disciplines including philosophy, literature, political science, history and sociology will provide groundwork for our explorations, which will be filled out through case studies, historical texts and literary narratives. Cross-listed: WS 480. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: ENG 110 and ENG 280.
ED & IDENTITY IN PLRALISTIC SOCIETY ETHS 200 D ETHS (3.00 credits)
Students will examine, interact with, and explore the pluralistic and diverse educations and identities of peoples in Wisconsin, the United States, and beyond through the lenses of privilege, oppression, and opportunity before and beyond the 21st century. Individual and institutional discrimination will be examined through culturally significant identity vistas that include race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, class, language, and ability. Through self-analysis and reflection, historical investigation linked with analysis of contemporary schools and society, school/community-based experiences, and communication-skill building, students will learn how to be culturally responsive to the contexts of communities and the dynamics of difference. Course meets Wisconsin DPI American Indian Tribes requirement. Course will have a primary emphasis on Wisconsin Teacher Standards 3, 6, and 10 and will involve fieldwork. Cross-listed: ED 200 Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: sophomore standing or consent of the School of Education.
ETHNIC STUDIES INTERNSHIP ETHS 495B ETHS (1.00 - 3.00 credits)
The internship offers Ethnic Studies majors and minors firsthand knowledge, skills, and experiences related to ethnic studies. Students will work in a setting that serves racially and ethnically diverse populations, and internships will be available through sites approved by the Ethnic Studies Program. Majors are required to complete a minimum of three credits, or eight hours per week throughout the semester for a total of 120 hours. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: Junior standing, ETHS 201, concurrent enrollment in ETHS 495A, and consent of instructor.
ETHNIC STUDIES INTERNSHIP SEMINAR ETHS 495A 3 ETHS (1.00 credits)
The internship seminar examines and reflects on the knowledge, skills, and experiences acquired from internship settings. Integrating the Ethnic Studies Program goals, the General Education COR guiding questions, and the internship experience, the course explores the following key questions: What does the internship mean to one's studies as an Ethnic Studies major/minor and one's intended profession? What are the ethical implications of interning or working at a site that serves primarily communities of color? In what ways do race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and class intersect and shape power relations in the internship setting, and what is the student intern's social location in the setting? What are the unique needs and contributions of the historically marginalized racial and ethnic groups and the new (im)migrant populations in our communities? How does the internship deepen one's understanding of one's own gifts, values, and commitments in building a just, compassionate world? Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: Junior standing, ETHS 201 DJ, concurrent registration in ETHS 495B or an internship course in a related field, and COR II.
FAULKNER&MORRISON: SLAVERY'S LEGACY ETHS 250C CD ETHS (4.00 credits)
Very few important American writers have considered slavery and its legacies in American culture with the intensity and originality of William Faulkner and Toni Morrison. Their novels and stories span the nineteenth and twentieth centuries to show how the effects of slavery haunted later generations up to the present day. This course examines these two writers within a rich context of secondary readings to provide rich historical, cultural, and theoretical contexts. Students will learn how to interpret themes of race and ethnicity in strong literary and socio-historical contexts. The course will focus particularly on how course readings reflect the legacies of slavery in U.S. culture. Cross-listed: ENG 250B CD. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: None.
FOC STUD: ETHNIC AM STUDIES-SLAVERY ETHS 443B CDX ETHS (4.00 credits)
This course will examine a range of scenes of slavery as depicted in literary fiction, period accounts, historical documentation, photography and other imagery, and critical theory. This range of texts and images will reveal the lived experiences of slaves across time periods and different geographic locations. We will examine how slaves were transported to the Americas (particularly North America), how their enslavement was achieved materially and psychologically, how their bodies were treated and abused, how they were viewed by sympathizers and opponents of slavery, how the idea of slavery figured in debates about the establishment of the new United States, how they revolted and rebelled and how these rebellions were quashed, how they were controlled through legal and cultural circumscription, how they sought control of their own circumstances and destinies, how they sought escape and sometimes succeeded, and how they wrote accounts of their experiences in an effort to be heard. Cross-listed: ENG 443B CDX. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or W cornerstone.
FOUNDATIONS OF ESL & BILINGUAL EDUC ETHS 262 ETHS (3.00 credits)
This course introduces students to the historical, political, and social issues that contributed to the formulation of local, state, and federal educational policies for linguistically and culturally diverse students. The aspects of language acquisition theories as they relate to specific program models are included through a prism of cultural and linguistic relevant pedagogy and educational empowerment through family and community engagement. Cross-listed: ED 262. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: Preliminary Entry to Teacher Education.
FREEDOM RIDES: CIV RIGHTS&BLACK PWR ETHS 480B 3D ETHS (4.00 credits)
In this course students will learn about the freedom struggle in the North, so that they can better understand that the Movement--and racism--was and is not confined to the American South but that places such as Milwaukee, Chicago, Indianapolis and Detroit all witnessed very turbulent freedom movements in the 1960s and 1970s. In addition to lectures, discussions, films, and guest lectures, a big portion of this course will center around our "Freedom Rides" throughout the North during spring break. We will travel to all the aforementioned cities, visiting important places from the Civil Rights era, as well as listening to veterans of that struggle. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: junior standing and consent of the instructor.
IMMIGRANT NARRATIVES ETHS 380 CD ETHS (4.00 credits)
This course investigates the issue of immigration, border, and identities in modern and contemporary immigrant narratives in the United States. Focusing on texts of various genres, such as fiction, film, memoir, and poetry, by writers of diverse ethnic and racial ancestries, we will explore these key questions: What are the major themes and issues in immigrant narratives? What does it mean to cross borders, and what are the causes, possibilities, and problems of border crossings? In what ways do immigrant subjects challenge or negotiate boundaries that seek to oppress, exclude, or constrain? How do race and ethnicity intersect with other salient social identities such as class, gender, sexuality, religion, and nationality in the construction of immigrant identities? In what ways do immigrant narratives challenge or accommodate the U.S. national discourse of immigrant assimilation and upward mobility? In what ways can literary and cultural studies empower us as we seek to understand the urgent issues of immigration, citizenship, and identities in today’s national and global contexts? Prerequisite: W tag
INDEPENDENT STUDY - ETHNIC STUDIES ETHS 479 ETHS (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
An in-depth exploration of an ethnic studies topic. Ethnic Studies program approval and supervision required. Cross-listed: None. Offered: F/S/SS Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
INTEGRATIVE SEMINAR IN ETHNIC STUDI ETHS 480 ETHS (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
The seminar integrates advanced research and community-based learning, focusing on selected themes or issues in ethnic studies. Synthesizing the goals of the major and minor, the course applies integrative approaches to the development of multicultural understanding. For two-session topics, students must complete both semesters to satisfy the ETHS 480 requirement. Cross-listed: 300-400 level COR courses approved by Ethnic Studies. Offered: F/W/S/SS Prerequisite: junior standing or consent of the instructor.
INTEGRATV SEM: PHILOSOPHY OF MLK JR ETHS 480C 2DP ETHS (4.00 credits)
This course discusses a shared inquiry into the nonviolent philosophy of M.L. King and its relevance both in the Civil Rights movement and in diverse communities in the U.S. and beyond. Students will study and discuss Dr. King's writings, reflect on their own potential for helping build the "Beloved Community," and engage in relevant service learning projects such as Amnesty International, the United Nations Association, and Fair Trade Advocacy. If funds are available, we may travel to the Civil Rights Museum in Memphis. Cross-listed: PHIL 307 2DP. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: Completion of COR 1 or COR 199 or COR 199 in progress; two full-time semesters of college credit, excluding retro credits, AP credits, and college credit earned while in high school; completion of the T Tag or concurrent enrollment in a T Tag course.
INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION ETHS 317 D ETHS (3.00 credits)
This course is the study of how individuals perceive and react to cultural rules, and how those perceptions and reactions affect the ways they communicate with one another. The general goals of the class are for students to develop understanding of the role that identity plays in intercultural communication, develop understanding of how cultural rules affect communication, learn how cultures differ from each other and how they come together and coexist, and develop competence in communicating with people of various cultures in the United States and beyond. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: None.
INTRO TO CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY ETHS 222 GJ ETHS (4.00 credits)
This course provides an introduction to the nature and diversity of human society and culture through an examination of specific cross-cultural cases. It includes a comparative study of social, political and economic organization, patterns of religious and aesthetic orientations, gender issues, relations with the natural environment, as well as the process of sociocultural persistence and change. Special consideration will be given to the circumstances faced by contemporary small-scale societies. Cross-listed: ANTH 222 GJ. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: None.
INTRODUCTION TO ETHNIC STUDIES ETHS 201 DJ ETHS (4.00 credits)
This is a gateway course for majors and minors in Ethnic Studies, as well as for all who are interested in learning about race and ethnicity in the United States within a global context. Using sociological, historical, literary, and other disciplinary concepts and methods, the course introduces the history and current development of ethnic studies as an academic discipline; fundamental concepts and issues in ethnic studies; and the historical, social, and cultural experiences of African American, Latino/a American, Asian and Pacific American, and Native American peoples and/or other historically marginalized racial and ethnic groups in the United States, focusing on issues of race and ethnicity as they intersect with class, gender, sexuality, and nation. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: None.
LITERATURE OF AMERICAN MINORITIES ETHS 242 CDX ETHS (4.00 credits)
This course provides an introduction to literatures of ethnic minorities in the US, including Native American, African American, Hispanic American, and Asian American literatures. We will read a number of significant 20th and 21st century texts that have shaped ethnic minority traditions and have become part and parcel of American literature. We will explore such major issues as identity, culture, history, race, gender, sexuality, and class. We will examine how these texts present specific ethnic experiences via diverse literary means and innovations and by doing so contribute to American literature and culture. Cross-listed: ENG 242 CDX. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or W cornerstone.
MULTICULTURAL ART IN THE USA ETHS 264 ADU ETHS (4.00 credits)
This course provides an inclusive, multicultural introduction to 20th- and 21st-century art of the US, with emphasis on ways that art is related to the historical, social, and cultural contexts in which it is created. We consider such questions as: How have the social dynamics of race and ethnicity, along with gender and class, shaped the experiences of American artists and their audiences at various historical moments during the past hundred years? How do artists' social positions inform their artistic responses to questions of modernity? What does art by artists of diverse ethnicities tell us about the historic and contemporary experiences of various cultural groups in the US? As well as exploring movements in art of the US and the work of individual artists of various ethnicities, this course introduces the students to methodological and theoretical issues underlying the study of modern and contemporary art in the US, and ways that consideration and critical analysis of multiple disciplinary and social perspectives can enrich our understanding of this art. Readings, class discussion, group inquiry projects, and other assignments will emphasize the development of reflective, creative, and critical approaches to the study of visual art. Cross-listed: ART 264 ADU. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: None.
NATIVE AMERICAN ART ETHS 362 ADX ETHS (4.00 credits)
This course provides an introduction to North American Indian, or Native American, art, and to the broader questions underlying its study. Focus will be on post-contact Native American art, the impact on this art of encounters between Indian and non-Indian peoples, and 20th-21st century art. Particular attention is given to indigenous perspectives through the writings of Native American scholars and artists. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or W cornerstone.
NATIVE AMERICAN SPIRITUALITY ETHS 480J 2D ETHS (4.00 credits)
An experiential and community-based survey of native religious traditions, exploring the breadth and depth of spiritual expression among native people in North America, with particular emphasis on the Anishinaabe bands of Wisconsin. Important themes include sacred landscapes, mythic narratives, oral histories, communal identities, tribal values, elder teachings, visionary experiences, ceremonial practices, prayer traditions, and trickster wisdom. This course includes significant engagement in Native American communities. Cross-listed: RS 351 2D. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: Completion of COR 1 or COR 199 or COR 199 in progress; two full-time semesters of college credit, excluding retro credits, AP credits, and college credit earned while in high school.
PASSING NARR: ETHNIC AM LITERATURE ETHS 443A CDQ ETHS (4.00 credits)
The term passing refers to the disguises of elements of an individual's presumed "natural" or "essential" identities, such as race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and/or class.  In this course, we will study selected works of various genres (fiction, memoir, and film) which narrate and negotiate acts of passing.  Attending to the intersections of race, ethnicity, gender, class, and sexuality in passing narratives and situating these texts in their historical, cultural, and critical contexts, we will examine the ways in which women and men from diverse ancestries in American literature and culture imagine the possibilities of passing while grappling with its complexities and limitations. We will explore the following key critical questions: What motivates passing, and what are the possibilities, consequences, and limitations of passing? What are the similarities and differences between racial and gender passing? In what ways do passing narratives destabilize the binaries of White/non-White, man/woman, authenticity/counterfeit and call into question the "absoluteness" of identity categories? In what ways does passing remain relevant in today's U.S. cultural and sociopolitical contexts?   Cross-listed: ENG 443B CDX. Offered: S Prerequisite: ENG 110 and sophomore standing. 
PHILOSOPHY AND MASS INCARCERATION ETHS 202 DP ETHS (4.00 credits)
This course examines the philosophical questions raised by criminal law. This course will examine how various philosophers and social theorists have justified criminal punishment. We will pay special attention to how liberal democratic societies reconcile commitments to individual liberty with practices of confinement. We will connect this study to moral, political, and experiential reflections on mass incarceration, especially as they relate to racial, sexual, and class hierarchies in the US. This course will include a community learning project. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: PHIL 101.
PHILOSOPHY AND RACE ETHS 330 DPU ETHS (4.00 credits)
This course will examine philosophical analyses of race, considering a range of views from race as a biological feature of individuals to race as a social construction and hence a political issue. We will consider whether (and how) notions of race relate to practices of racism, asking both ethical questions (how should people of different races be viewed and treated?) and metaphysical questions (what IS race?). Would a just world be one which has gotten "beyond" race, or would that ideal perpetuate a dangerous desire for sameness? Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: None.
RACE & ETHNICITY ETHS 309 D ETHS (4.00 credits)
This course engages students in an analysis of historical and contemporary experiences of race and ethnicity in the United States as influenced by changing migration trends and economic developments. Special consideration is given to the social construction of racial categories; issues of whiteness; and multiracial identity. Cross-listed: SOC 309 D. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: One of the following: SOC 201, ANTH 222, PSY 101.
RETHINKING THE BORDER: US IMMIGRATN ETHS 150B 1D ETHS (3.00 credits)
Though the traditional US immigrant narrative focuses on those immigrants who came into Ellis Island, in the shadow of the Statue of Liberty, this course turns its gaze to the long US-Mexican border (understood both as a physical barrier between the two countries, but also a psychological reality) and the crucial role of Mexican immigrants in shaping the US, not only in the traditional 'borderlands' of California and the Southwest, but across the country. While we focus on the experiences of Mexican immigrants, we also give attention to the larger historical context of US immigration. Through an exploration of a range of immigrant expressions (songs, narratives, fiction, documentaries, interviews), this course examines the roles and contributions of Mexican and other immigrants in US history. Against the backdrop of an increasingly multicultural United States, we consider the breadth and depth of cultural history and experience that make up the US, even as we examine the ways in which immigrants (both historically and today) come under attack. Cross-listed: None. Offered: F Prerequisite: This course is for first semester freshmen.
SENIOR SEMINAR IN ETHNIC STUDIES ETHS 490 X ETHS (4.00 credits)
In this capstone research seminar, graduating majors and minors will be guided to examine a significant issue in the critical study of race and ethnicity and complete an intermediate-length research paper, integrating the theories and methods from prior Ethnic Studies coursework and reflecting knowledge and approaches from more than one Ethnic Studies-related field. In guiding students throughout the research and writing process, the seminar seeks to enhance their abilities not only to analyze, evaluate, and synthesize published primary and secondary research but also to conduct firsthand research and contribute to the public and academic discourses on the issue. At the same time, the course invites students to examine the ethical implications of their research, especially its impact on communities of color and the power relations between the researcher and the researched, and to forge connections among academic inquiry, advocacy, and social change. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: Senior standing, ETHS 390, ETHS 495A, and ETHS 495B or consent of the instructor.
SOCIAL MOVEMENTS IN AMERICAN HISTOR ETHS 204 DH ETHS (4.00 credits)
The course examines the process of social change in U.S. history from the period of Native American and European contact to the 1980s. Emphasis will be placed on analyzing the causes and consequences of "rights" movements in American history. Cross-listed: HIST 204 DH. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: None.
TAP DANCE:TECHNIQ & CULT PERSPECTIV ETHS 301 BD ETHS (3.00 credits)
This course, for students with little or no knowledge of tap dance, spans the development and place of the form from its early roots in the Americas of 1600 to the present. It combines pedagogical study of the multi-cultural elements of this art from participatory studio work to build basic understanding of music, movement and cultural sensitivity. An American hybrid art form, the course illuminates the intersection of history and culture. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: None.
THEMES AND ISSUES IN ETHNIC STUDIES ETHS 250 ETHS (3.00 - 4.00 credits)
A study of historically marginalized racial and ethnic groups in the U.S. through the exploration of various topics, such as ethnic autobiography, slave narratives, the Civil Rights movement, Chicano art, or the graphic novel. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: None.
THEMES: AMERICAN SLAVE NARRATIVES ETHS 250B CDX ETHS (4.00 credits)
During the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, slaves of African origin composed a series of autobiographies that revised literary genres to finally give voice to experiences shared by millions forced into bondage over several centuries. As first-person stories with great political and historical significance, slave narratives reflect the inherent disjunction between the American ideal of equality and its continued use of brutal forced servitude. The development of the slave narrative as a literary genre provides a unique perspective on American cultural and political history while acknowledging voices long exiled from the American canon. Cross-listed: ENG 260A CDX. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or W cornerstone.
THEMES: MULTI-ETHNIC GRAPHIC NOVEL ETHS 250D CDX ETHS (4.00 credits)
This course is designed to introduce to students to contemporary multi-ethnic American literature through the graphic novel as an increasingly significant literary genre for academic inquiry. We will read a number of significant graphic novels by Native American, African American, Latino/a American, Jewish American, Asian American, and white American graphic novelists and will explore such major issues as identity, culture, history, memory, community, race, gender, sexuality, and class. Students will gain knowledge of diverse multi-ethnic experiences and various literary expressions through the genre of the graphic novel and will develop critical thinking, reading, and writing skills to interpret literary texts. Cross-listed: ENG 250D CDX. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or W cornerstone.
THEORIES & MTHODS IN ETHNIC STUDIES ETHS 390 KU ETHS (4.00 credits)
How has "race" been explained and explored by different disciplines? What new conceptual and interpretive approaches have been developed in ethnic studies? What does it mean to conduct research on issues of race and ethnicity, and how do we understand the power dynamics between the researcher and the researched? This course provides a study of critical theories and research methods in ethnic studies. Examining an array of critical approaches, such as sociological study of race and racism, postcolonial studies, Black feminism, and diaspora studies, we will develop the critical frameworks for understanding race and racism as a historical and contemporary phenomenon in the United States and in a global context. The course also develops skills and strategies for ethnic studies research and examines anti-oppressive methodologies that reconceptualize the power relations between the researcher and the researched. Prerequisite: ETHS 201; sophomore standing and higher.
TOPIC: AFRICAN AMERICANS AND FILM ETHS 271B H ETHS (4.00 credits)
The course examines the portrayals of African Americans in Cinema/TV over the past century. Students will also become well-versed in African American history as a whole to better contextualize the films they study in the semester. In addition, the course seeks to demonstrate the continuity and change in African American history and in Hollywood's portrayal of Black people. For instance, how did African Americans respond to the depiction of Blacks in Birth of a Nation and Shaft? How (and why) has Hollywood shifted its portrayal of people of color over the years? Finally, this course will emphasize the differences between primary and secondary documents as well as the pros and cons that each may have for students of history. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: None.
TOPICS IN ETHNIC LITERATURES ETHS 260 CD ETHS (4.00 credits)
A Course focusing on the intersection between literature and ethnicity or Ethnic Studies. Specific versions of the course might focus on topics like the
TOPICS IN ETHNIC STUDIES ETHS 401 ETHS (3.00 - 4.00 credits)
Advanced study of selected themes or issues, such as ethnic diasporas, immigration, indigenous history, or race and popular culture. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: None.
TOPICS: AFRO-AMERICAN COMMUNITIES ETHS 430B ETHS (3.00 credits)
This course explores African-American language, culture, and communication with in-depth and critical interpretations within a social and historical context. Cross-listed: COMMS 430B. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: None.
TOPICS: ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS ETHS 401A K ETHS (3.00 credits)
In this course we will focus on the theories, ethics, and issues related to counseling within a multicultural context. Working effectively with diverse clients requires self-awareness, the skills for successful interaction, and knowledge of information specific to various cultures/populations, and the ability to engage in a relationship with those from other cultures/populations. Implications of cultural ethnic, geographic, and sexual diversity are considered as they relate to developing a multicultural perspective in studying and understanding human behavior, as well as its application in professional settings. Cross-listed: PSY 382 D. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: PSY 101 J or consent of the instructor.
TOPICS: MULTICULTURAL COUNSELING ETHS 382 D ETHS (4.00 credits)
In this course we will focus on the theories, ethics, and issues related to counseling within a multicultural context. Working effectively with diverse clients requires self-awareness, the skills for successful interaction, and knowledge of information specific to various cultures/populations, and the ability to engage in a relationship with those from other cultures/populations. Implications of cultural ethnic, geographic, and sexual diversity are considered as they relate to developing a multicultural perspective in studying and understanding human behavior, as well as its application in professional settings. Cross-listed: PSY 382 D. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: PSY 101 J or consent of the instructor.
WOMEN AND MULTICULTURAL THEOLOGIES ETHS 344 DQR ETHS (4.00 credits)
How do women theologians from diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds understand and discuss God, Jesus, Human Beings, the Bible, Spirituality, Ecology and the Roles of Women in religion and society today? How do North American women "do theology" in their African-American, Latina, Native American, Asian-American, Euro-American and/or socio-economic contexts? What kinds of theology are women theologians in Latin America, Asia and Africa doing? In what ways do race, ethnicity, gender, class, sexuality, and nation shape the formation and development of Christian feminist theologies? From multicultural perspectives, this course explores the questions, experiences, values, concerns, and challenges that women bring to the understanding and practice of Christian faith and its implications for building a more just and compassionate world. Cross-listed: ETHS 344 DQR. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: I-, T-, and W- tags or their equivalents.