Ethnic Studies Courses

The program offers a wide range of courses that fulfill both Multicultural Perspectives and many other General Education requirements. Ethnic Studies courses also complement many majors and minors in the humanities, social sciences, the arts, and education, such as English, History, Religious Studies, Psychology, Sociology, Art, Communication Studies, and Education.

AFRICAN AMERICAN HISTORY ETHS 359 D ETHS (4.00 credits)
African American history from the beginning of the African Diaspora to the present. Cross-listed: HIST 359 D. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: None.
ASIAN AMERICAN EXPERIENCE ETHS 271 2DH ETHS (4.00 credits)
A course that examines major issues in the history of the Asian American experience from the middle of the 19th century to present. Prerequisites: Completion of COR 1 or COR 199 or COR 199 in progress; two full-time semesters of college credit, excluding retro credits, AP credits, and college credit earned while in high school.
ASIAN AMERICAN WRITERS ETHS 325A CDQ ETHS (4.00 credits)
This course offers a study of selected works of various genres (e.g., fiction, poetry, drama, and film) by Asian American women and men of diverse ethnicities. Emphasizing the intersections of race, gender, class, and sexuality, and informed by critical studies of race and ethnicity, feminist criticism, and cultural studies, we will explore the following main questions: What are the major themes and issues in Asian American literature and literary studies? What textual strategies do Asian American writers employ to represent Asian American self-identities and cultural politics? In what ways do these writers challenge or accommodate dominant representations of Asian American women and men as raced and gendered subjects? In what ways do the subject positions of the writers, characters, and readers impact our understanding of Asian American texts? Cross-listed: none. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: ENG 110 W.
BEYOND ORIENTALISM: (POST)COLONIAL ETHS 319 AGQ ETHS (4.00 credits)
.  Geisha, Madame Butterfly, China dolls, Arabian bazaars, exotic sampans, mysterious mountain peaks----these are just some of the recurring images of Asia, or "the Orient," in the European and American popular imagination. The place of Europe's oldest, richest colonies and the U.S. military adventures and territorial expansions, Asia has become not only an integral part of the imperial West's material culture and civilization but also its exotic, mysterious, feminine, and ultimately inferior Other. A persistent critic of the Western supremacist ideologies has been Edward Said, who refers to the West's imperialist and masculinist constructions of the East as Orientalism, a set of terms, ideas, and principles that contain and control the Otherness of the Orient. In what ways has the colonial West's conceptualization of the East persisted or changed in contemporary cinema since Said's epochal critique over four decades ago? How has Said's notion of Orientalism been extended and modified in postcolonial and postcolonial feminist film studies? How is the Orientalist discourse reproduced, complicated, and challenged in Western and Eastern film? In what ways do race, gender, and nation intersect in Orientalist cinematic narratives? In what specific historical and geopolitical contexts do cinematic texts portray (anti-) Orientalist images and visions of Asia? In what ways are such inquiries relevant or urgent as we negotiate the complex relations between women and men as well as the East and the West in today's cultural and geopolitical contexts? In this course, we will explore these key critical questions and understand film as an important cultural, as well as art, form for the production, dissemination, and critique of Western European and American knowledge about genders, sexualities, and nations.  Prerequisite: W tag
BLACK WOMEN WRITERS ETHS 415A CDQ ETHS (4.00 credits)
This course offers a study of selected novels, short stories, and essays by African American women writers in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.  Emphasizing the intersections of race, gender, class, and sexuality, and informed by critical studies of race and ethnicity and Black feminist criticism, we will explore the following main questions: What are the major themes and issues in Black women's literature?  What textual strategies do African American women writers employ to represent Blackness, womanhood, and Black womanhood? In what ways do these writers challenge or accommodate dominant discourses of race, gender, class, and sexuality? What does it mean to be a Black feminist reader, and what does it mean for non-Black and/or non-female readers to interpret Black women's writings? Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: Completion of W Tag.
CONTEMPORARY GLOBAL FEMINISMS ETHS 481 GQU ETHS (4.00 credits)
What issues are important to women in different parts of the world? How do those issues relate to one another? What makes an issue "feminist" or not? How do we conceive of feminisms outside of our borders, whether those borders are geographic, political, or personal? What strategies can we employ to understand women's lives and concerns in different cultures, locations, and times? Is it possible to actively support feminist causes across the globe without imposing dangerous sets of limiting assumptions? This course is an exploration of the methods, concepts, and experiences of feminism as it is practiced all over the world in different ways. The historical development and cultural mappings of feminism since the second wave will be our main concern, but we will maintain specificity by focusing on particular locations, and on locational concerns. Three large units will make up the course: feminism and race at the end of the second wave and into the present; postcolonial critiques of feminism and issues of religion, rights, and class in various locations throughout the world; and transnational approaches to feminist identity, politics and possibilities. Throughout our explorations of contemporary feminisms, we will interrogate how our own lives and choices affect the lives of women around the world, in part by investigating the origins of products we purchase regularly. Feminist theorists from a variety of disciplines including philosophy, literature, political science, history and sociology will provide groundwork for our explorations, which will be filled out through case studies, historical texts and literary narratives. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: W tag and ENG 280 or ENG 281.
FOC STUD: ETHNIC AM STUDIES-SLAVERY ETHS 443B CDX ETHS (4.00 credits)
This course will examine a range of scenes of slavery as depicted in literary fiction, period accounts, historical documentation, photography and other imagery, and critical theory. This range of texts and images will reveal the lived experiences of slaves across time periods and different geographic locations. We will examine how slaves were transported to the Americas (particularly North America), how their enslavement was achieved materially and psychologically, how their bodies were treated and abused, how they were viewed by sympathizers and opponents of slavery, how the idea of slavery figured in debates about the establishment of the new United States, how they revolted and rebelled and how these rebellions were quashed, how they were controlled through legal and cultural circumscription, how they sought control of their own circumstances and destinies, how they sought escape and sometimes succeeded, and how they wrote accounts of their experiences in an effort to be heard. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or W cornerstone.
FREEDOM RIDES: CIV RIGHTS&BLACK PWR ETHS 480B 3D ETHS (4.00 credits)
In this course students will learn about the freedom struggle in the North, so that they can better understand that the Movement--and racism--was and is not confined to the American South but that places such as Milwaukee, Chicago, Indianapolis and Detroit all witnessed very turbulent freedom movements in the 1960s and 1970s. In addition to lectures, discussions, films, and guest lectures, a big portion of this course will center around our "Freedom Rides" throughout the North during spring break. We will travel to all the aforementioned cities, visiting important places from the Civil Rights era, as well as listening to veterans of that struggle. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: consent of the instructor.
INDEPENDENT STUDY - ETHNIC STUDIES ETHS 479 ETHS (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
An in-depth exploration of an ethnic studies topic. Ethnic Studies program approval and supervision required. Cross-listed: None. Offered: F/S/SS Prerequisite: consent of instructor.
INDEPENDENT STUDY - ETHNIC STUDIES ETHS 379 ETHS (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
An in-depth exploration of an ethnic studies topic. Ethnic Studies program approval and supervision required. Prerequisites: consent of instructor.
INTEGRATIVE SEMINAR IN ETHNIC STUDI ETHS 480 ETHS (1.00 - 4.00 credits)
The seminar integrates advanced research and community-based learning, focusing on selected themes or issues in ethnic studies. Synthesizing the goals of the major and minor, the course applies integrative approaches to the development of multicultural understanding. For two-session topics, students must complete both semesters to satisfy the ETHS 480 requirement. Cross-listed: 300-400 level COR courses approved by Ethnic Studies. Offered: F/W/S/SS Prerequisite: junior standing or consent of the instructor.
INTEGRATV SEM: PHILOSOPHY OF MLK JR ETHS 480C 2DP ETHS (4.00 credits)
This course discusses a shared inquiry into the nonviolent philosophy of M.L. King and its relevance both in the Civil Rights movement and in diverse communities in the U.S. and beyond. Students will study and discuss Dr. King's writings, reflect on their own potential for helping build the "Beloved Community," and engage in relevant service learning projects such as Amnesty International, the United Nations Association, and Fair Trade Advocacy. If funds are available, we may travel to the Civil Rights Museum in Memphis. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: Completion of COR 1 or COR 199 or COR 199 in progress; two full-time semesters of college credit, excluding retro credits, AP credits, and college credit earned while in high school; completion of any PHIL course except PHIL 101.
MULTICULTURAL ART IN NORTH AMERICA ETHS 253 AD ETHS (4.00 credits)
This course provides an inclusive, multicultural introduction to art of North America, with emphasis on ways that art is related to the historical, social, and cultural contexts in which it is created. Rather than attempting to consider all of the art produced over this long span of time, we will focus on particular aspects of American art, foremost among these the visual manifestations of the cross-cultural encounters between diverse peoples as central to the history of art of this continent. We will consider the relationships between American art and European art, and visual art and material culture as the expressions of particularly "American" identities by American artists and craftspeople of various ethnicities. Our study will emphasize the historical and cultural contexts in which this diversity of art has been produced. We consider such questions as: How have the social dynamics of race and ethnicity, along with gender and class, shaped the experiences of American artists and their audiences at various historical moments since pre-contact through the modern period? How do artists' social positions inform their artistic responses to questions of modernity? What does art by artists of diverse ethnicities tell us about the historic and contemporary experiences of various cultural groups in the US? As well as exploring movements in art of North America and the work of individual artists of various ethnicities, this course introduces the students to methodological and theoretical issues underlying the study of art in North America, and ways that consideration and critical analysis of multiple disciplinary and social perspectives can enrich our understanding of this art. Readings, class discussions, group inquiry projects, and other assignments will emphasize the development of reflective, creative, and critical approaches to the study of visual art.   
NATIVE AMERICAN ART ETHS 362 ADX ETHS (4.00 credits)
This course provides an introduction to North American Indian, or Native American, art, and to the broader questions underlying its study. Focus will be on post-contact Native American art, the impact on this art of encounters between Indian and non-Indian peoples, and 20th-21st century art. Particular attention is given to indigenous perspectives through the writings of Native American scholars and artists. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: ENG 110 or W cornerstone.
PASSING NARR: ETHNIC AM LITERATURE ETHS 443A CDQ ETHS (4.00 credits)
The term passing refers to the disguises of elements of an individual's presumed "natural" or "essential" identities, such as race, ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and/or class.  In this course, we will study selected works of various genres (fiction, memoir, and film) which narrate and negotiate acts of passing.  Attending to the intersections of race, ethnicity, gender, class, and sexuality in passing narratives and situating these texts in their historical, cultural, and critical contexts, we will examine the ways in which women and men from diverse ancestries in American literature and culture imagine the possibilities of passing while grappling with its complexities and limitations. We will explore the following key critical questions: What motivates passing, and what are the possibilities, consequences, and limitations of passing? What are the similarities and differences between racial and gender passing? In what ways do passing narratives destabilize the binaries of White/non-White, man/woman, authenticity/counterfeit and call into question the "absoluteness" of identity categories? In what ways does passing remain relevant in today's U.S. cultural and sociopolitical contexts?   Cross-listed: ENG 443B CDX. Offered: S Prerequisite: ENG 110 and sophomore standing. 
PHILOSOPHY AND MASS INCARCERATION ETHS 202 DP ETHS (4.00 credits)
This course examines the philosophical questions raised by criminal law. This course will examine how various philosophers and social theorists have justified criminal punishment. We will pay special attention to how liberal democratic societies reconcile commitments to individual liberty with practices of confinement. We will connect this study to moral, political, and experiential reflections on mass incarceration, especially as they relate to racial, sexual, and class hierarchies in the US. This course will include a community learning project. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: PHIL 101.
PHILOSOPHY AND RACE ETHS 330 DPU ETHS (4.00 credits)
This course will examine philosophical analyses of race, considering a range of views from race as a biological feature of individuals to race as a social construction and hence a political issue. We will consider whether (and how) notions of race relate to practices of racism, asking both ethical questions (how should people of different races be viewed and treated?) and metaphysical questions (what IS race?). Would a just world be one which has gotten "beyond" race, or would that ideal perpetuate a dangerous desire for sameness? Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: None.
RACE & ETHNICITY ETHS 309 D ETHS (4.00 credits)
This course engages students in an analysis of historical and contemporary experiences of race and ethnicity in the United States as influenced by changing migration trends and economic developments. Special consideration is given to the social construction of racial categories; issues of whiteness; and multiracial identity. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: One of the following: SOC 201, ANTH 222, PSY 101.
RACE AND RACISMS ETHS 290 DGJ ETHS (4.00 credits)
This course introduces the critical study of race and ethnicity in the United States and other parts of the world.  Using an intersectional framework, global considerations, and sociological as well as other disciplinary concepts and methods, the course guides our understanding of the history and current development of the discipline of ethnic studies; fundamental concepts and issues in ethnic studies; racial dynamics and the historical, social, and cultural experiences of historically marginalized racial and ethnic groups in the United States and around the world.  Key themes and issues include: What is ethnic studies, how has it evolved over time and in the age of migration and globalization, and why are global perspectives essential in the critical study of race and ethnicity? What is race? How have racial ideologies and racisms evolved since the beginning of European colonialism and the U.S. history? In what ways do racialized policy and institutions create and perpetuate racial inequality in education, employment, housing and wealth, the criminal justice system, health and environment, and immigration policy?  In what ways do other countries compare with the United States in racial dynamics? Finally, what are the visionary frameworks and our own roles for achieving racial justice?  Prerequisites:
SELECTED ISSUES ETHS 271B H ETHS (4.00 credits)
Selected issues varies by topic. Prerequisites: None.
SOCIAL MOVEMENTS IN AMERICAN HISTOR ETHS 204 DH ETHS (4.00 credits)
The course examines the process of social change in U.S. history from the period of Native American and European contact to the 1980s. Emphasis will be placed on analyzing the causes and consequences of "rights" movements in American history. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: None.
TOPICS IN ETHNIC LITERATURES ETHS 260 CD ETHS (4.00 credits)
A Course focusing on the intersection between literature and ethnicity or Ethnic Studies. Specific versions of the course might focus on topics like the
TOPICS: ENGLISH LANGUAGE LEARNERS ETHS 401A K ETHS (3.00 credits)
In this course we will focus on the theories, ethics, and issues related to counseling within a multicultural context. Working effectively with diverse clients requires self-awareness, the skills for successful interaction, and knowledge of information specific to various cultures/populations, and the ability to engage in a relationship with those from other cultures/populations. Implications of cultural ethnic, geographic, and sexual diversity are considered as they relate to developing a multicultural perspective in studying and understanding human behavior, as well as its application in professional settings. Cross-listed: PSY 382 D. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: PSY 101 J or consent of the instructor.
TOPICS: MULTICULTURAL COUNSELING ETHS 382 D ETHS (4.00 credits)
In this course we will focus on the theories, ethics, and issues related to counseling within a multicultural context. Working effectively with diverse clients requires self-awareness, the skills for successful interaction, and knowledge of information specific to various cultures/populations, and the ability to engage in a relationship with those from other cultures/populations. Implications of cultural ethnic, geographic, and sexual diversity are considered as they relate to developing a multicultural perspective in studying and understanding human behavior, as well as its application in professional settings. Cross-listed: none. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: PSY 101 J or consent of the instructor.
WOMEN AND MULTICULTURAL THEOLOGIES ETHS 344 DQR ETHS (4.00 credits)
How do women theologians from diverse racial and ethnic backgrounds understand and discuss God, Jesus, Human Beings, the Bible, Spirituality, Ecology and the Roles of Women in religion and society today? How do North American women "do theology" in their African-American, Latina, Native American, Asian-American, Euro-American and/or socio-economic contexts? What kinds of theology are women theologians in Latin America, Asia and Africa doing? In what ways do race, ethnicity, gender, class, sexuality, and nation shape the formation and development of Christian feminist theologies? From multicultural perspectives, this course explores the questions, experiences, values, concerns, and challenges that women bring to the understanding and practice of Christian faith and its implications for building a more just and compassionate world. Cross-listed: None. Offered: No Information Provided. Prerequisite: I-, T-, and W- tags or their equivalents.